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How to Write a Thesis Statement

How to Write a Thesis Statement

❶But one begins to detect a new theme emerging in some of these authors, especially in Hemingway: You want your thesis statement to be identifiable as a thesis statement.

Thesis Statement Definition




The thesis statement is that sentence or two in your text that contains the focus of your essay and tells your reader what the essay is going to be about. Although it is certainly possible to write a good essay without a thesis statement many narrative essays , for example, contain only an implied thesis statement , the lack of a thesis statement may well be a symptom of an essay beset by a lack of focus.

Many writers think of a thesis statement as an umbrella: The thesis statement is also a good test for the scope of your intent. The principle to remember is that when you try to do too much, you end up doing less or nothing at all. Can we write a good paper about problems in higher education in the United States? At best, such a paper would be vague and scattered in its approach. Can we write a good paper about problems in higher education in Connecticut?

Well, we're getting there, but that's still an awfully big topic, something we might be able to handle in a book or a Ph. Can we write a paper about problems within the community college system in Connecticut.

Now we're narrowing down to something useful, but once we start writing such a paper, we would find that we're leaving out so much information, so many ideas that even most casual brainstorming would produce, that we're not accomplishing much. What if we wrote about the problem of community colleges in Connecticut being so close together geographically that they tend to duplicate programs unnecessarily and impinge on each other's turf?

Now we have a focus that we can probably write about in a few pages although more, certainly, could be said and it would have a good argumentative edge to it. To back up such a thesis statement would require a good deal of work, however, and we might be better off if we limited the discussion to an example of how two particular community colleges tend to work in conflict with each other.

It's not a matter of being lazy; it's a matter of limiting our discussion to the work that can be accomplished within a certain number of pages. The thesis statement should remain flexible until the paper is actually finished. It ought to be one of the last things that we fuss with in the rewriting process.

If we discover new information in the process of writing our paper that ought to be included in the thesis statement, then we'll have to rewrite our thesis statement.

On the other hand, if we discover that our paper has done adequate work but the thesis statement appears to include things that we haven't actually addressed, then we need to limit that thesis statement. Unless you make sure that you provide a clear explanation, such terms cannot send any explicit message to the audience.

You must never infer that the significance of a phrase is evident. Afterwards, think about where it would be better to define such terms. Make a comparison between the original thesis lacking particularity and straightforwardness and the adapted version considerably more particular and straightforward: In spite of the fact that the gray wolf is an easily frightened and mild critter, people are gradually eradicating it.

If this animal is so mild, why are people eradicating it? In spite of the fact that the gray wolf is, in fact, an easily frightened and mild critter, people are gradually eradicating it because they unjustly regard it as a ferocious and bloodthirsty beast. The thesis statement ought to represent more than a mere presentation of the subject.

No matter what you do, steer clear of universal arguments and formula assertions. Such techniques are good for creating an outline for your paper, but will undoubtedly annoy the audience. Proceed with reexamining the thesis until it mirrors your genuine viewpoints. Do not use formula and universal terms. Seek tangible topics and active verbs. Here are a couple of examples that illustrate the way in which particular word uses emphasize and elucidate the significance.

When writing the thesis statement, you must utilize your own words. Do not use quotes! If you devise a unique, imaginative and unforgettable thesis statement, it will leave a lasting impression on your audience. If you copy or reproduce the words of others, it will diminish your authority in the eyes of your readers. If you wish to be more believable, you need to catch the interest of your audience by using your personal opinions and words. An adequately-devised thesis statement mirrors adequately-devised viewpoints.

In the above persuasive thesis, you can see my opinion about Narnia followed by three clear reasons. This thesis is perfect for setting up a tidy five-paragraph essay. In college, five paragraph essays become few and far between as essay length gets longer. Can you imagine having only five paragraphs in a six-page paper? For a longer essay, you need a thesis statement that is more versatile. Instead of listing two or three distinct points, a thesis can list one overarching point that all body paragraphs tie into.

In this thesis, I have made a claim about the theme in Narnia followed by my reasoning. I am no longer limited in how many body paragraphs I can logically use. One thing I find that is helpful for students is having a clear template.

While students rarely end up with a thesis that follows this exact wording, the following template creates a good starting point: Conversely, the formula for a thesis with only one point might follow this template: When composing a thesis, you must consider not only the format, but other qualities like length, position in the essay, and how strong the argument is. A thesis statement can be short or long, depending on how many points it mentions. Typically, however, it is only one concise sentence.

It does contain at least two clauses, usually an independent clause the opinion and a dependent clause the reasons. You probably should aim for a single sentence that is at least two lines, or about 30 to 40 words long.

A thesis statement always belongs at the beginning of an essay. This is because it is a sentence that tells the reader what the writer is going to discuss.


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This handout describes what a thesis statement is, how thesis statements work in your writing, and how you can discover or refine one for your draft. Does my essay support my thesis specifically and without wandering? If your thesis and the body of your essay do not seem to go together, one of them has to change.

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The thesis statement is the sentence that states the main idea of a writing assignment and helps control the ideas within the paper. It is not merely a topic. It often reflects an opinion or judgment that a writer has made about a reading or personal experience.

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In composition, a thesis statement is a sentence in an essay, report, research paper, or speech that identifies the main idea and/or central purpose of the text. Also called the controlling idea. A thesis can be found in many places—a debate speech, a lawyer’s closing argument, even an advertisement. But the most common place for a thesis statement (and probably why you’re reading this article) is in an essay.

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Aug 31,  · How to Write a Thesis Statement. Whether you're writing a short essay or a doctoral dissertation, your thesis statement can be one of the trickiest sentences to formulate. Fortunately, there are some basic rules you can follow to ensure 77%(). Thesis statement is an essential part of a good essay. It can be made up of one or two sentences and its purpose is to share the main idea with the reader. It can be made up of one or two sentences and its purpose is to share the main idea with the reader.